It is morally wrong to make a mother choose between treatment for herself and treatment for her newborn. It is morally wrong that people should be dying of AIDS when treatment is available.
It is morally wrong that babies are still being born with HIV when we know how to prevent it. It is morally wrong that children are still growing up as AIDS orphans.
To be a partner for women and girls against violence and injustice, you do not have to be experts on human rights or gender. You do have to be committed to always asking in your daily work: 'How can I better engage women and girls to understand what they need'
A society that cuts itself off from its youth severs its lifeline; it is condemned to bleed to death.
When the history of our times is written, will we be remembered as the generation that turned our backs in a moment of global crisis or will it be recorded that we did the right thing?
No disease group is as vast and complex in scope as the noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). Incorporating social determinants such as income and education, the NCDs call for an equally massive and comprehensive response
There are 1.2 billion adolescents across the world, 9 out of 10 of these young people live in developing countries. Millions are denied their basic rights to quality education, health care, protection and exposed to abuse and exploitation.
Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane.
“The early years in a child’s life—when the human brain is forming—represent a critically important window of opportunity to develop a child’s full potential and shape key academic, social, and cognitive skills that determine a child’s success in school and in life.”—President Barack Obama
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"The true character of a society is revealed in how it treats its children. History will judge us by the difference we make in the everyday lives of children."—President Nelson Mandela

Biochemical Manifestation of HIV Lipodystrophy Syndrome

Kenneth Ihenetu, PhD, Darius Mason, PharmD

Abstract


Objectives
Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), including protease inhibitors (PI) have led to dramatic improvements in the quality and quantity of life in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, a significant number of AIDS patients on HAART develop characteristic changes in body fat redistribution referred to as lipodystrophy syndrome (LDS). Features of LDS include hypertrophy in the neck fat pad (buffalo hump), increased fat in the abdominal region (protease paunch), gynecomastia and loss of fat in the mid-face and extremities.

Methods
The aim of this paper is to review the current knowledge regarding this syndrome. This article reviews the published investigations on biochemical manifestation of HIV lipodystrophy syndrome.

Results
It is estimated that approximately 64% of patients treated with PI will experience this syndrome. Biochemically, these patients have increased triglycerides (Trig), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and extremely low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C).

Conclusions and Public Health Implications
It is hoped that awareness of this syndrome would aid in early diagnosis and better patient management, possibly leading to a lower incidence of cardiovascular complications among these patients.

Key Words
HIV Lipodystrophy Syndrome, Highly active anti-retroviral therapy, Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors, buffalo hump.


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21106/ijma.6

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