It is morally wrong to make a mother choose between treatment for herself and treatment for her newborn. It is morally wrong that people should be dying of AIDS when treatment is available.
It is morally wrong that babies are still being born with HIV when we know how to prevent it. It is morally wrong that children are still growing up as AIDS orphans.
To be a partner for women and girls against violence and injustice, you do not have to be experts on human rights or gender. You do have to be committed to always asking in your daily work: 'How can I better engage women and girls to understand what they need'
A society that cuts itself off from its youth severs its lifeline; it is condemned to bleed to death.
When the history of our times is written, will we be remembered as the generation that turned our backs in a moment of global crisis or will it be recorded that we did the right thing?
No disease group is as vast and complex in scope as the noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). Incorporating social determinants such as income and education, the NCDs call for an equally massive and comprehensive response
There are 1.2 billion adolescents across the world, 9 out of 10 of these young people live in developing countries. Millions are denied their basic rights to quality education, health care, protection and exposed to abuse and exploitation.
Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane.
“The early years in a child’s life—when the human brain is forming—represent a critically important window of opportunity to develop a child’s full potential and shape key academic, social, and cognitive skills that determine a child’s success in school and in life.”—President Barack Obama
“If art is to nourish the roots of our culture, society must set the artist free to follow his vision wherever it takes him.”—President JF Kennedy
"The true character of a society is revealed in how it treats its children. History will judge us by the difference we make in the everyday lives of children."—President Nelson Mandela

Vol 2, No 2

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21106/ijma.V2.N2

Table of Contents

Original Article

Rasaki O. Shittu, MB.BS, MPH, FWACP, Baba A. Issa, MB.BS, MPH, FWACP, Ganiyu T. Olanrewaju, MB.BS, FWACP, Abdulraheem O. Mahmoud, MB.BS, FMCOph, Louis O. Odeigah, MB.BS, FWACP, Abdullateef G. Sule, MB.BS, FWACP
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Pages 174 – 181
Musawenkosi H L Mabaso, PhD, Thoko Ndaba, MSc, Zilungile L Mkhize-Kwitshana, PhD
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Pages 182 – 189
Romuladus Emeka Azuine, DrPH, RN, Gopal K. Singh, PhD, Sussan E. Ekejiuba, DVM, PhD, Eta Ashu, MSc, Magnus A. Azuine, PhD
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Pages 190 – 199
Abdallah Ibrahim, DrPH, Anne Marie O’Keefe, PhD, JD
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Pages 200 – 208
Srijana Pandey, PhD, Supendra Karki, MPH, MA
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Pages 212 - 219
Chelsea E Modlin, BA, Helga Naburi, MD, Kristy M. Hendricks, ScD, RD, Goodluck Lyatuu, MD, Josphine Kimaro, RD, Lisa V. Adams, MD, Paul C Palumbo, MD, C. Fordham von Reyn, MD
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Pages 220 - 228
Ranbir S. Balgir, PhD
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Pages 229 - 235
Michelle Meyer, BA, Molly Elmer-DeWitt, BA, Cinthia Blat, MPH, Starley B. Shade, PhD, Ijaa Kapule, MBChB, PhD, Elizabeth Bukusi, MBChB, PhD, Craig R. Cohen, MD, Lisa Abuogi, MD
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Pages 236 - 243
Amos Kankponang Laar, PhD, Belynda Amankwa, MPH, Charlotte Asiedu, MPH
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Pages 244-249

Commentary

Gregory Pappas, MD, PhD
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Pages 209 – 211
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